Samir Salameh was born in Safad in Palestine in 1944. During Al-Nakba in 1948, when Samir was four years old, he and his family were deported and forced to become refugees. From Majd al-Kroum, in the Galilee, to Lebanon and finally to Syria in Dira’a Refugee Camp, the young boy faced the harsh reality of losing home, stability, and freedom.

Samir managed to gain entry into the Damascus Fine Arts Academy in 1967, where he was privileged to study under some of the finest teachers, including Fateh Al-Modarres, Nazir Nabaa, and Nasir Showra. He graduated in 1972 and moved to Lebanon to work at the media office of the PLO where he spent three years developing the political posters of the resistance movement. He then studied at the Ecole Nationale des Beaux Arts in Paris and worked at a number of jobs that included drawing tourists’ faces, teaching art, and finally working on Arabic publications at UNESCO.

After the Oslo Agreement, Samir returned to Palestine, where he worked for two years on the technical designs for the Red Crescent Society hospital in Khan Younis. Afterwards he went to Ramallah to oversee Al-Hallaj Gallery before being seconded to work with the Red Crescent Society in Al-Bireh until his retirement in 2004. Samir currently lives and works in France.